Sharx Security VIPcella-IR Wifi Wireless Security Network Camera with Infrared Night Vision SCNC2607 802.11

Sharx Security VIPcella-IR SCNC2607 Wifi Wireless 802.11 b/g/n Security Network Camera with Infrared Night Vision

Sharx Security VIPcella-IR SCNC2607 Wifi Wireless 802.11 b/g/n Security Network Camera with Infrared Night Vision Rating:
List Price: $399.95
Sale Price: $130.00
Availability: unspecified

Product Description

This Wifi b/g wireless IP camera has its own built in web server. You can view the video from your own home network or you can configure your router to view and control the camera from computers or cellphones on the internet, without dependence on any third party web sites or subscriptions. With the built-in microphone you can listen in. Excellent MPEG4 or MJPEG video quality at a full 640 x 480 resolution with up to 30 frames per second for fluid, natural motion color. For viewing or recording a single camera no software is required besides just your browser. For viewing or recording multiple Sharx IP cameras the included MultiView software for PCs supports up to 4 Sharx IP cameras simultaneously. Truly amazing to see the streaming video on your web enabled cell phone. For frequent use we recommend to upgrade your cellphone service to unlimited data, which costs just $15/mo extra on the ATT network. You can see motion even on non-3G phones like SonyEricsson w580i. If your phone does not support video you can see automatically refreshing JPEG images. At home, you can use this camera with your laptop or iPhone as a baby or pet monitor, and the very high light sensitivity in "moonlight mode" allows you to view out from a window to see what's happening in the street as long as there is some background light available. This camera has infrared night vision which can see in total, absolute darkness. Like any infrared sensitive camera, the daytime colors are subdued and can appear unnatural especially on plants and vegetation. For eye-popping, gorgeous daytime colors please select the less expensive Sharx SCNC2606 camera if you do not need night vision in total darkness. Wireless operation supports WEP, WPA, WPA2 encryption. On routers with UPnP feature the camera can set itself up automatically, and on routers without UPnP (such as Apple's Airport series) the camera can be set up with our step by step instructions.

Details

  • Hi-Resolution Wifi b/g IP Network Camera with infrared night vision
  • Full 30 fps MPEG4 video performance at 640 x 480 resolution with audio
  • See streaming video on ATT, Sprint, Verizon and T-Mobile smartphones including iPhone and BlackBerry
  • Motion detection or timed emails and FTP uploads
  • Supports Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox, Linux, VLC, QuickTime, 3GPP

Sharx Security VIPcella-IR SCNC2607 Wifi Wireless 802.11 b/g/n Security Network Camera with Infrared Night Vision out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 682 user reviews
Infrared Cameras & Video IP Network Cameras Sharx Security Sharx Security VIPcella-IR SCNC2607 Wifi Wireless 802.11 b/g/n Security Network Camera with Infrared Night Vision This Wifi b/g wireless IP camera has its own built in web server. You can view the video from your own home network or you can configure your router to view and control the camera from computers or cellphones on the internet, without dependence on any third party web sites or subscriptions. With the built-in microphone you can listen in. Excellent MPEG4 or MJPEG video quality at a full 640 x 480 resolution with up to 30 frames per second for fluid, natural motion color. For viewing or recording a single camera no software is required besides just your browser. For viewing or recording multiple Sharx IP cameras the included MultiView software for PCs supports up to 4 Sharx IP cameras simultaneously. Truly amazing to see the streaming video on your web enabled cell phone. For frequent use we recommend to upgrade your cellphone service to unlimited data, which costs just $15/mo extra on the ATT network. You can see motion even on non-3G phones like SonyEricsson w580i. If your phone does not support video you can see automatically refreshing JPEG images. At home, you can use this camera with your laptop or iPhone as a baby or pet monitor, and the very high light sensitivity in "moonlight mode" allows you to view out from a window to see what's happening in the street as long as there is some background light available. This camera has infrared night vision which can see in total, absolute darkness. Like any infrared sensitive camera, the daytime colors are subdued and can appear unnatural especially on plants and vegetation. For eye-popping, gorgeous daytime colors please select the less expensive Sharx SCNC2606 camera if you do not need night vision in total darkness. Wireless operation supports WEP, WPA, WPA2 encryption. On routers with UPnP feature the camera can set itself up automatically, and on routers without UPnP (such as Apple's Airport series) the camera can be set up with our step by step instructions. $399.95 http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41vK2tdP-YL._SL160_.jpg
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9 Responses to “Sharx Security VIPcella-IR Wifi Wireless Security Network Camera with Infrared Night Vision SCNC2607 802.11”

  1. KM Says:

    Rating

    This camera provides essentially the same quality as AirLink 101 SkyIPCam777W, but costs twice as much and does not have pan and tilt. I was happy after I bought it but needed a few more cameras and didn’t want to spend a fortune. Finding SkyIPCam777W allowed me to see that such camera does not need to cost $300. Sharx may have a bit better color in the afternoon, although I haven’t compared them side by side – I may do that later. At this point I would be undecided about which one to choose at the same price level, but twice the price for less features is unjustifiable.

  2. M. Bildaci Says:

    Rating

    I was quite hesitant to purchase this item, after having several unsuccessful experiences in the past with other IP cams. But with this item, I did see that, the technology is finally maturing, with affordable and quality products. I have used the wireless feature, and it is working without any glitch. In the past, wireless was always a problem with other IP cams. I was considering to get Axis cameras, but due their expensive nature, it is hard to justify the expenditure, however, researching on the web for 2 weeks or so, I have decided to go with Sharx.

    One statement. I never leave feedbacks. I am so much impressed with the support service of this company, and the quality of their product, that, I really feel, it is unfair for people to NOT know what is out there…

    so, buy it, you will not be sorry.

  3. Beechfuzz Says:

    Rating

    Everyone needs to know that there are at least three versions of this camera floating around. There is, 1) this camera (Sharx SCNC2607), 2) Y-Cam Black SD, and 3) LTS LTCIP830MV-B. All three cameras are EXACTLY THE SAME. They are all the same camera (all the internal parts are the same), just re-branded. The only difference between them is PRICE. Sharx’s camera costs around $300; the Y-Cam’s camera costs around $285; and LTS’s camera cost about $150. Newegg sells the LTS version for $150 + free shipping; I bought mine from an Altex store for $160. Y-Cam makes housing units for these for $100 if you want to mount them outdoors. So, there is absolutely no reason for anyone to pay more than $150-$170 for this camera.

    You can download the firmware and software upgrades only from Y-Cam’s website (which makes me believe that they are the original manufacturers of this product). On Y-Cam’s site, click on “Downloads” on the left side. A page will load asking you to register; scroll down to where it says “Don’t want to register?” and click the link to access the downloads. The firmware will be for the “Y-Cam Classic – 2nd Generation.” From this page, you can also download the latest MultiLive program (free). MultiLive is the software bundled with the LTS version of this camera (I assume it’s also bundled with the Sharx and Y-Cam version too). When I upgraded my camera’s firmware to 3.38, it kept all my wifi , detection, and other settings, so that was nice.

    For $160 (what I paid for the LTS version), this was an excellent buy. I don’t think you can get any better than that. The night vision is great compared to any other sub-$200 IP Camera. The WIFI range is also good. I have the camera mounted outside above a floodlight on the front of my garage (12 or 13 feet above the ground) while my router is at the other end of the house, about 50 feet away. The camera gets about 2 bars of signal strength, which is good for that far away considering how many walls it’s communicating through, and the picture is still great.

    The web interface is on spot for a $160 camera. You can adjust everything from the light frequency, microphone volume, 11 different streaming modes, on-screen display (if you want the time and date displayed on the picture), nightvision settings, etc. There also a plethora of options for motion detection, alarms, and automated scheduling. You can set it up to automatically upload videos and pictures to an FTP server or other off-site location, and email you when an alarm is triggered. You can also set up different areas on the screen with different Motion Detection thresholds and sensitivities. For instance, if you have this mounted above your driveway, you can configure the camera to make your entire driveway super sensative with a low tolerance for movement (to monitor for intruders wanting to break into your car or garage), and you can configure the sidewalk and street to have a lower sensitivity and higher movement tolerance (to prevent false alarms triggered from random cars driving by or neighbors walking on the sidewalk).

    The MultiLive software that comes bundled with it does a pretty good job too, though I’m sure that there are more advanced professional versions for commercial use. But for home use MultiLive is good enough. MultiLive knows when the camera sets off an alarm, and it immediately starts recording and saving the video to my computer. A one-minute video takes up about 5.4MB of space. That’s with the highest quality setting the camera can handle. MultiLive allows you to specify how long you want it to record video whenever an alarm is triggered. For instance, I have it set to record for 15 seconds whenever an alarm is triggered. That way if false alarms occur during the night (which they do every few minutes thanks to my motion sensor floodlights turning on whenever a bug flies in front of it) then you won’t be using up too much disk space for false alarms.

    The picture quality is pretty good for a 640×480 resolution picture. There is some low-light ISO graininess when recording in low-light indoor settings. The night vision picture quality is okay. Not the worst, but not the best. For me, the picture is a bit washed out. The edges of one of my cars blends in to the dark ground and is hard to see. But that may be because I have a 20w CFL lightbulb turned on all night lighting up the driveway.

    This camera is really for indoor-use only. However, I have it mounted outside anyways. I sealed the edges of the lens and shell of the camera with clear silicone, so we’ll see how well it holds up. Alternatively, you can order an outdoor housing unit for it for $100 from Y-Cam’s website.

    The web interface works best with Internet Explorer. It does work in Firefox, but it’s a little glitchy, and the camera doesn’t display in Firefox. I haven’t tried a Mac or in Google Chrome yet.

    Pair this camera up with a router that supports dyndns accounts, and you can view your camera from any internet connection.

    I’ll update this post as I use this camera more.

  4. oneforjule Says:

    Rating

    The manual is very well written and easy to follow. I got streamed movies to my iphone in 30 minutes. However, the camera has very limited wireless range. The signal drops to 1 bar when my laptop still has 4 bars of signal. At this point, the image quality and frame rate deteriorate to almost unusable. The weakness seriously limits where you can install the camera and render the “wireless” part almost useless, because at such a short distance, you can probably wire the camera for better data transport and security. I am not impressed by the image qulity as well. In a well lit room, the color of image is purple-ish and blurry. On the other hand, the software appear to intuitive and stable. Simply put, nice software (including the manual) but mediocre hardware. At this price, I cannot say that the money is well spent.

  5. A. Tryba Says:

    Rating

    If you are like us and many new parents, you may have purchased an inside-the-house video baby monitor – such as the Summer. In this day in age, however, an even better solution is one that works both inside your house AND outside your house on your cell phone or at work!

    This Sharx SCNC2607 is amazing and perfect for our baby cam. Great picture during the day and absolutely awesome images at night when there is no light in the baby’s room! This was exactly what I was looking for when looking at the more expensive solutions such as Axis, Sanyo, etc (which were going to cost me over $500!). I was concerned that the Sharx would be of lower quality but I’ve been very pleasantly surprised…

    Here are some benefits we’ve found by having the Sharx SCNC2607:

    1. When Daddy is at work, I can keep a small window of the baby’s room on my screen to see my little girl whenever I have a spare minute!

    2. We have the camera setup as an icon on Mommy’s iPhone so she can easily click on the camera and view the baby’s crib. Whenever Mommy is away (and the Nanny, Grandparents, or Daddy is watching the baby) she can view into the room and see her little girl. Even inside the house we found that Mommy carries her iPhone around with her and its more convenient to have 1 consolidated device rather than also carrying around the Summer receiver.

    3. We setup the Grandparents with an secure account to be able to look into the webcam and see their granddaughter anytime… We actually turned off the audio though to ensure we maintain some privacy in our conversations within the baby’s room :)…

    4. Screen size using the Sharx and the iPhone is 2x the Summer screen and has a much larger viewing angle.

    So how hard is this to setup? I’d rate it on the moderately technical side. If you have any experience setting up a wireless network at home then it should be a breeze but you need to configure some things in your router. You’ll take the camera out of the box, plug it directly into the router, run their little IP Finder software, then go into the camera and setup passwords, user accounts, etc. On the router (I have a Linksys), you’ll need to go to the Applications & Gaming tab and setup Port Forwarding so you can securely tunnel into your home network to see the camera. Not difficult but I can see how someone with no experience may struggle a bit. Good news is that the camera comes with one of the best installation guide’s I’ve ever seen that walks you through it all and even gives you steps to setup your own URL (through DDNS).

    There is one thing you should keep in mind when going with a webcam instead of an inside-the-house monitor – the webcam is a `passive’ device. Meaning you need to go to the webcam on your iPhone to see the camera. The inside-the-house versions that are `always on’ enables us to put the baby to bed and listen to the monitor when she wakes. You can enable audio on the webcam but you still need to have it up on the iPhone to hear it (and likely Mommy is doing Facebook, etc). If I were to do this over again, I would simply buy a cheaper audio-only inside-the-house monitor to hear when the baby wakes up and use the Sharx for the video whenever I want to see the baby. (Or I could go old school and just listen for the baby to cry but what type of a techno-daddy would I be then :)?)

    I’ll finish with the customer service I received by the guys at SecurCam. One word – fantastic. I first purchased the SCNC2602W. However, I didn’t realize that this camera didn’t work with my iPhone or non-Internet Explorer browsers. I contacted the folks at SecurCam and they explained the issue and very quickly helped me out by selling me the 2607 even before the product was officially launched! They’ve been awesome at responding to my technical issues, have a great online support setup, and flat-out great products. In the day in age where everyone is cutting back and outsourcing their support to overseas – these guys set a new standard in personalized support. I’d not only purchase additional cameras from them, but if they went into business on other items I would not hesitate to purchase them also. Keep up the great work guys!!!

  6. Jeff Says:

    Rating

    After trying different crummy baby monitors out there, switched to this and we love it. The picture quality is great, and the setup was very easy. The manual is very detailed and walks you through much more than you will need to know.

    I would recommend to anyone that you read the directions on your router and assign the camera a reserved IP address – what that means is that anytime the camera is turned on, your router will always give it the same IP address, say it is 192.168.0.10 – then in any web browser on your network, all you do is type in “http://192.168.0.10″ and hit enter, then when you get to the camera Save that page as a Bookmark. Then drag that bookmark to your desktop and voila at any time you just double-click that icon and instantly you are looking at what your camera sees.

    When you first setup a reserved IP by the way you will need to first connect the camera to the router, then in the router settings find it under Connected Devices (or however that is worded in your router), and write down the Mac ID (00:24:F4:…..) those digits, then plug those into the reserved IP section and name your camera something like Sharx1 or such. Most devices you buy tell you the Mac ID somewhere on the box or on the back of the device, this does not so you have to dig it up.

    In an iPod touch (I have that but not an iPhone), if you do also then open safari, type in the same address as above and get to where you can see the camera (iPods can see but will not have sound so you know), hit Save to Main Page and then you permantly can just hit that icon as well and boom are right in. (These directions are for when you are at home on the same network, enabling from when you are away from home is covered in the manual).

    It’s a very nifty device, I would give it 5 stars except I also seem to have trouble with the wireless from just a few rooms away from the router, seems it needs to be very close for wireless to work, I was ok because our house has Cat6 outlets everywhere so I just plugged it in and with that there are no issues, but be warned if you have to have wireless you will need to be somewhat in a near proximity to the router to work right from what I can tell so far.

    I would not be discouraged from this though, the built in web server is such a great feature and it is sooooooo much better than anything else I have tried on the market, I would recommend anytime and am in fact going to add a 2nd one soon.

  7. Senor Borracho Says:

    Rating

    I recently purchased the SCNC2607 IP-Cam to use as a video server that I could access from within my home on my PC’s and iPhones, as well as to access the video from anywhere outside my home LAN if I want.

    Not requiring any special software to access this camera is the single most important item for me. If you want to be able to log into a camera from anywhere in the world, on any machine that has a connection to the internet and a web browser of some type, this is the one. There is also an included application called “Multi Live” which allows you to view up to 4 cams in one window.

    The camera itself was pretty easy to set up, and the image quality is superb! No tricky setup decisions are necessary by the user to decide what type of streams are available to whoever logs into it from whatever platform. If you log into it on an iPhone through Safari, the iPhone negotiates with the camera server software and automatically appends the URL with the “/en/mjpgmain.asp” extension. If logged in from Internet Explorer, the basic URL automatically appends the “en/avmain.asp” extension. All you need to do is type the URL of the camera into your browser and the rest is taken care of automatically.

    Safari on the iPhone will not process the audio stream, but this is not a problem with the camera, it is a limitation with Safari. I have read that Safari on a Mac computer will also not process the audio stream. I have tried various iPhone applications to process the audio stream, without success. But the designer of IP Vision by TTrix software has written me that an upcoming version will process audio. I have also tried this camera on a Sony PSP-3000 with the current firmware version (installed on 02-10-09) and current Flash update, but the device chokes up on memory limitations and can only process the jpeg still image. Some tablet PC’s and/or WiFi portable media players like the Nokia N810 or Archos 605 might work, but I haven’t tried them.

    The default image quality settings don’t need to be tweaked to lower quality settings unless your upload bandwidth gets maxed out. For one login to the camera (over the internet from work) I was able to use the maximum quality settings and didn’t see or hear any problems. My connection at home is cable internet with about 128 Kilobyte upload and 5 Megabit download, so I was worried about upload speed. With 8 users logged on, there could be issues requiring some settings tweaks, but that’s more than most people are probably going to be worried about. If you connect within your LAN then you don’t need to be concerned with upload bandwidth, because the data isn’t passing through your modem.

    There is a color setting, moonlight setting, and night vision setting, but I choose to let the camera do what it thinks it needs to do and have left these controls in automatic. The night vision works even in absolute darkness, and the image is crisp and clean. There is a setting for motion detection, with variable parameters to offset alarms or recording from occurrences like ceiling fans or a bird flying past a window.

    When viewing the camera on your browser, you have some easy control buttons available to take snapshots in either .bmp or .jpg formats. You can also record to your hard drive, in the .asf format. Recording can be stopped and started with the “Record” button, or started with the button and stopped by a maximum file size input that anyone logged in can specify. These picture and video controls can be run by anyone you authorize in either the admin account or any user accounts you set up.

    The user accounts (an account created that is not the admin account) has no access to your settings for the camera, so it’s a good one to send to Mom and Dad or your crazy aunt. When they get to the logon screen, if they choose “Enter” they can see what’s on your camera and record what they see and/or hear. If they try to enter “Settings” then they are presented with the login username/ password box again. As long as they don’t have your admin password, then you are safe from unauthorized changes to the camera settings.

    For up to 8 concurrent logons, you don’t need to create 8 separate guest user accounts. One will suffice. I have logged onto one guest account through a browser on my PC over the internet, through my iPhone on WiFi over the internet, and also through another browser on the same PC but using the LAN IP address. That’s pretty cool to be able to log on over LAN or WAN while connected through the same router the camera is connecting to. Like if somebody chops up your internet cable connection with a ditch digger, you can still see the cam by using the LAN address.

    The instruction manual supplied with the camera is very good. I only found one typo and it wasn’t important. It was not translated three times from an original language using obscure clucking noises and hieroglyphic symbols. An email to tech support was answered promptly and with great attention to detail. The techies are REAL ENGINEERS, not some morons in monkey suits with a license to confuse and aggravate.

    I mentioned before that the camera “itself” was easy to set up. That is true. What might be a bit challenging for some is the router configuration. I suggest while waiting for the camera to be delivered, brush up on your router’s help files. Find the range of IP addresses your router is assigning to devices automatically, such as 192.168.1.25 through 192.168.1.125, because the IP address you choose to assign to the cam to make it a permanent host will be somewhere outside of that range. Also check to see if your router has the latest firmware. My Trendnet TEW-452BRP had a glitch with running DDNS updates, even if all the fields were input properly. This would have caused me great frustration had I not checked the website first.

    If you want to access the cam from outside your LAN, then read up a little bit on DDNS. I’m using a free account from “no-ip.com” and there is a brief primer on using this service in the camera instruction manual. Check your router to see if it has an automatic function to update your current IP Address to a DDNS server. It doesn’t have to, as your PC can do it for you automatically every time it boots with a free program you get after registering, but why not be redundant if you can? If you decide to set up DDNS so as to access the cam through WAN, then find out how to give the cam TCP and UDP privileges on a specified port number, typically using a function called “Virtual Server.” Otherwise you would open “DMZ” or perhaps “Special AP” to give the cam connectivity rights.

    Be warned that DMZ opens all ports, which might be dangerous. Special AP is for programs which require multiple connections that are blocked by NAT, so again that might be dangerous as well. Using Virtual Server only opens the ports necessary for functionality of this specific device, so it is the best way to punch that hole through the wall into the WWW. And remember, if you are restricting access to the router by use of MAC numbers, shut that off when first installing the cam or else you won’t get it to connect. Later you can turn it back on.

    None of this is rocket science, but if problems do occur, the Engineers at Sharx are competent and they are committed to not letting you fail. It even says so in the instruction manual!

  8. J. Cheshire Says:

    Rating

    We’ve recently had some trouble with neighborhood kids setting off acid bombs and we wanted to try and catch the hooligans in the act. I did quite a bit of research on outdoor cameras, but all of them required coax wiring and AC wiring to the mount point. It just wasn’t worth the effort, especially given the high price. That’s when I found the Sharx SCNC2607.

    I was a little apprehensive about spending so much money for this camera, but I was swayed by the many great reviews. I have to say that I’m impressed by the feature set of this little guy, and the image quality is outstanding.

    Because I want to keep an eye on the front of the house, I have this camera mounted with 3M Command Strips and pointed out my home office window. During the daylight hours, this works incredibly well. However, once darkness hits and the IR kicks in, the reflection of the IR illuminators on the window make night vision completely unusable. This isn’t a problem specific to this camera. All IR cameras pointed out of a window experience the same problem. I have chosen to solve that by purchasing an IR illuminator (about $60) that I have put in the front of the house. This works incredibly well and I can see quite clearly at night. The IR illuminator looks like a bright spotlight shining out into the yard when viewed through the Sharx, but it’s invisible to the human eye.

    The only other minor issue I’ve encountered is that the ActiveX control used to view the video in Internet Explorer will cause IE to crash if you change a lot of settings while watching the camera. Fortunately, IE recovers well from this and the tab is recovered and video continues. The only reason I mention it is that there doesn’t appear to be any servicing path for the software (downloadable updates), so it’s hard to know if these types of problems will be addressed. However, it’s not a big deal since once you configure all of your settings, there’s really no need to reconfigure anything. Therefore, no stars knocked for this.

    You can use Windows Media Player or QuickTime Player to view video on the camera as well. If you’re on Windows 7 or Windows Vista and you’re using WMP, you’ll need to disable audio on the camera due to a licensing issue with the audio codec necessary to play audio. On QuickTime, you’ll want to disable 3D acceleration in QuickTime preferences. URLs also differ based on what you’re using to view the camera. You can view the URL for any stream by clicking links when you are setting up streaming.

    You can also use third-party software to record video and watch more than one camera, assuming you aren’t happy with the MultiLive application that ships with the camera. I am using LuxRiot to record video, and even though it doesn’t list Sharx specifically as a supported camera, the SCNC2607 puts out a standard stream that LuxRiot can easily consume and use.

    If you’re looking for high-quality hardware in a security camera that has the flexibility to meet your needs as they evolve, this is a great choice! You definitely get what you pay for in this arena, and this camera is one that I highly recommend.

  9. Kevin H Says:

    Rating

    I purchased Sharx SCNC2607 camera for home security, so I needed it to be easy to set up, reliable, have good image quality, and work in all lighting conditions. I have tried similar cameras from other major manufacturers, and none of them work near as well as the Sharx. I normally write very brief reviews, but this one is worth a deeper look:

    Setup:

    First, when I unpacked the camera, I found a very thorough 44 page instruction manual that came with the camera, and it was all in English (how often do you find that these days?). I followed the setup steps which are simple. Plug the camera into a wired network connection, figure out what IP address the camera is (use the software included on the disk to do that), open internet explorer, and http to the camera. I did have to disable the windows firewall, as it was causing the video to be disconnected after a short period of time (same thing happened on other brand cameras). Once I did that, I never had another problem. My first impressions of the video quality were holy cow, this is really good quality compared to other brands.

    Included Software:

    The included software is pretty decent, especially considering the price point of this camera. This is not a professional megabuck camera, so I wasn’t expecting professional grade software. It allows viewing and management of up to 4 cameras at the same time, is pretty easy to use, and ran on my XP Pro computer without a hitch. You can set recording schedules, motion detection, max file sizes, and supposedly max amount of disk space to use. There was no help menus or documentation provided for the Multi-Live software, so you are on your own for this. Fortunately, it is pretty intuitive. I played around with max file sizes, limiting them to 2mb each. I did this so that in the event of a break-in, the files would break on about 30 second intervals. I have my security computer mirroring files to a hidden NAS device elsewhere on my network every 30 seconds, so if someone were to break in and take the computer, there is a pretty good chance the video would be copied to the other drive by then. Anyway, the only problem I found with Multi-Live is that it does not seem to limit how much space it will write for video files. In other words, if you are not monitoring your hard drive, it looks like it will just fill it up until the computer locks up due to no free space. I have an email into tech support on this issue. Other than that, I noted that you must have the Multi-Live software running in order to record video. You can also record video on motion detection with just the camera, and not install the Multi-Live software, but I also found that you must have an Internet Explorer window open, and be pointed to the IP address of the camera (have it on-screen). If you do not have an IE window open, or the Multi-Live software running, the camera will not record video. I was hoping for a direct feed to a NAS device, but this is not currently supported (tech support says it is in the works, but a fairly low priority). Again, not a deal-breaker, but a nice to have option.

    Micro-SD card:

    This camera has a micro-SD card slot in the bottom, which allows you to also record to the memory card at the same time as to a computer, or by itself with no computer. You can set continuous recording in specified segment lengths, or on motion detection. This works well, except for some unexpected behavior I noted. I was anticipating that when the memory card got full, the oldest files would be over-written by the new files, thereby keeping the most recent video on the card. Instead what happened for me is that as the card got full, the camera kept recording (or so I thought), and wrote 5 zero byte files. Once it figured out the card was full, the camera went offline for about a minute, while it erased the entire card, and then started recording again. It should be noted that the camera was offline not only for the memory card, but also for the Multi-Live software, and IE browser windows. In a nutshell, you better hope the card doesn’t get filled up during a break-in, because you would lose everything, and have a minute or so while the camera was down. I had a 32mb (very small) card that I was testing, and got about 10 minutes of video at max resolution. The instructions indicate it will support up to an 8gb card, but don’t state what type of card to buy (micro-SDHC I would presume, and nothing indicated about what class of card to buy). This is the only part of the owners manual that was lacking on documentation. As another reviewer indicated, there is zero information on their web site in the form of FAQ’s or additional guidance. Fortunately, they have excellent and very responsive tech support. I emailed them Labor Day weekend on Saturday, and got a response within 1 hour. On a Saturday! It appears their tech support are actually well-educated in the product, are not located in India, and provide thorough responses. I only wish they would document their info on their web site in the form of FAQ’s or a knowledgebase.

    Performance of Camera in Low Light:

    I tried this camera in all lighting conditions, from a well lit room, to zero light, and everything in between. Out of the box, the camera is set to go into night vision mode when the light is very low. It also goes into black and white mode when very dark. The quality of the images in a well lit room are outstanding. No graininess, good color, and it captures motion pretty well. In a low light situation, the camera goes into a moonlight mode, which cuts the frame rate by a factor of 4, and increases light amplification by a factor of 4. The result is very good image quality, but reduced frame rate. I think this is a great compromise. In a no-light situation, the infrared LED’s come on to provide light for the camera. They glow a dull red, so someone would be able to spot the camera in a dark room. The video switches to black and white, and is of surprisingly good quality. The LED’s provide good light for the camera out to about 15 to 20 feet. Plenty enough for even a pretty big room, but I would not expect this to work facing outside a window, into your driveway or yard. The manual states that the window would reflect the infrared light, and blind the camera. The video in night vision mode is good quality and clearly defined. The frame rate also appears to be cut down in night vision mode, as motion is not captured well. However, for a consumer grade camera, this works as good as I would ever expect it to. Very acceptable performance, and much better than anything else I have found on the market.

    Other Thoughts:

    I plan on buying more of these when the budget allows. The camera provides excellent quality video, is easy to set up, works well (albeit with a couple small caveats as noted above), and the tech support is outstanding (the clincher for me). Do not waste your time on other brand cameras. They did not work well for me in most respects. For me, if Sharx fixed the issue with the SD card, and fixed the issue of the camera consuming your entire hard drive when recording, it would be a near perfect camera. Otherwise, I rate it very good to excellent. I would have given it 4 stars, but the quick response by tech support on 3 occasions moves it up for me. On something technical like this camera, you need a company with good tech support. Sharx excels at this in my mind.

    UPDATE:

    Per Sharx’ tech support, they can resolve the issue of the camera erasing all files on the micro-SD card once it is full, and have only the older ones roll off. I had no choice but to give them my login information to my camera, and have them update it remotely. Not my preference, but they did the update quickly. I am still testing the issue of recording to the micro-SD card. For some reason, the camera seems to lock up and shut down when recording continuously to the card. However, I was testing it using a 32mb card. Sharx tech support says they only currently support 1-4gb cards. This may be the issue. More to follow.

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